Open happiness with Coke, interact with Ford C Max augmented reality six sheets and the rest,

Your Monday morning ideas shot,

Vanessa

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Monday = Ignition 5 time,

Enjoy,

Vanessa

Our top thought-starter picks for this week,

Enjoy,

Vanessa

We especially like the pink ponies case study!

Vanessa

Your last ignition fix of 2010, have a lovely Christmas and who knows how 2011 will ignite us….

Have fun,

Vanessa

-6 in Dublin this morning, brrrrrrr,

Enjoy reading,

Vanessa

Monday = ignition 5,

Enjoy,

Vanessa

Monday morning brainfood,

Vanessa

I especially like the Flatter Me phone service! Enjoy,

Vanessa

 

It might not surprise you that I believe in advertising. I know it’s my job, but I strongly believe in the power of media. When planned well, it can have amazing effects on people’s actions and brand perceptions. If done really well it can even get people excited. Nike, Coke, Guinness, the Movie guys…all great at fostering excitement in a target audience.

But something I’ve noticed in recent times, (with the evolution of social media and other things), is that PR is starting to play a more important role than, say five years ago. Brand managers are taking it into consideration more, and consequently plugging more of their marketing budgets into it.

I agree that PR is an important part of the marketing mix, but where do you draw the line? Arun Sudhamen says that it’s set to take a bigger share. Fine by me. Maybe the PR budget can move from 10% to 15%? That makes sense. But to 50%?? That’s wrong. PR should support media. Media should lead and PR follows, not the other way round. Media should propel out the message, and PR should follow and whisper it in people’s ears.

Because a PR campaign is dwarfed without Media support. Media can stand alone but PR cant.

As Neasa wrote previously the lines are blurring between creative, media and PR. The future is messy. Media agencies brainstorm and create (our ignition facility for example). PR agencies negotiate free media. Creative’s dictate media choices.

Who does what isn’t so clear. But I think moving chunks of money out of media and into PR isn’t a clever strategy. There is a limited amount of  PR you can negotiate, but there is limitless advertising space. 

Vanessa

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